Drop Your Drawers

Aliens crash land looking for other aliens when things go horribly wrong.

If you have read any of my racier novels, you might think of this as a prelude for some intimate moment.

That is not, however, what this is.  I know, I am sorry to disappoint you.  What this is about, is writing.  Let me take you back to a conversation of plotting vs. pansting.  (as in by the seat of.)

After taking a long hard look at Scrivener, I am thinking about purchasing it once again for my Macs.  I am a PC type person, but, programs like Vellum are only written for the MAC.  Vellum is the ‘cats ass’ when it comes to formatting your book.  You can either pay people to format your book, or, you can buy the program and do it yourself.

Vellum is very easy to use, which is the secret for Microsoft, and yes, the Mac OS as well.  Let’s contrast that with Scrivener.

I won’t give you a tutorial here on this blog about Scrivener, let’s just say it is not intuitive.  Is it worth it?

It is not the price for the software you have to consider; it is the learning curve.  Now add into the learning curve, is this the way you write?

As a Panster, I have resisted plotting any part of my novels.  I have a starting point, and I have an idea of where the ending place will be, and I kind of aim in that direction via a stream of consciousness.

Ok, so let’s drop our pants down to our undies and see where we go.

I would call on New Writers to get used to the idea of creating a logline first.  Let’s say you’re like me, laying there at night waiting for sleep to find you and this idea for a story is rolling around in your head.  What if?  is typically how it starts.

What if we had this guy that is digging around using a metal detector, and stumbles on to something that triggers his detector in a big way?  He is out in the country on land he recently purchased and built this metal detector from a kit.  He and his wife take off on Saturday for something to do as a husband and wife.  Ok, they have a metal detector, then what?

As they trace the arc of the signals returned to the device using little wooden markers, they discover that under their feet is a large metallic object.

While the reader is trying to guess what they found you, the writer is just writing it as if you are there with them, as the events unfold as it were.

What if you started your story with this?

A husband and wife spend the weekend looking for golden nuggets when strong signals send their metal detector into overdrive.  Moving a few boulders away from an outcropping buried by scrub brush, they find a metallic doorway with strange-looking controls by one side of it. Within moments they are inside an alien craft that was hidden by its occupants from centuries ago.

A good logline should be two sentences, not three, but 30 to 50 words or so is about right.

Let’s try again.

An undersea anomaly causing ships to sink brings the military and several different scientists in to solve the mystery.  As the secret unfolds, they discover an ancient alien civilization has been on Earth for hundreds of years, breeding with the indigenous people, creating those with god-like powers.

Ok, two lines 48 words.  This is a decent logline.  Now, as the writer, you take that logline and form an outline for your novel. Using something like Scrivener, you plot out your book, yes in your undies…ok not really.  You get the point.

Loglines are nothing more than a very brief tease to get the reader to open the book or buy tickets to the movie.  You, as the writer, can use them to keep you on target.

What might a tagline look like for this novel?

When the captain of a cruise liner barely escapes a disaster, he brings in the government, which discovers a city filled with aliens on the ocean floor.

These are all from my novel Ghost Signals of Colorado Springs.

If you are like me, sitting inside your house bouncing off the walls, take a trip to the stars in this futuristic adventure through time and space.  Please consider leaving a review on the site from which you purchased it.  Now, if you did not like it for some reason, please let me know here.  Feedback is critical for authors.

Much Love -TW

Author: AuthorTWScott

Author, Writer, Artist, Graphic Artist ... Over 32 published novels crossing many genres. www.authortwscott.com

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